Birds of my backyard – Part I

Not until I was given the basics of birding at a naturalist program I attended recently, did I start spotting various birds in my backyard. So far it was only the odd Bulbul or the Koel but now, to my astonishment, I can hear and distinguish between calls. Not that I can recognize the birds by listening to them but I can tell one call from the other and I have developed a keen ear for different calls. That’s a beginning, I suppose.

Since then, I have invested in a bird book and used it extensively to ID the birds (some of them are in this post too). I am supposed to invest in a binocular but prohibitive costs of a decent pair of binoculars will mean that I will have to wait until that happens. Meanwhile, take a look at these birds and follow on until at least you read the Rufus treepie story. Again, apologies for the not-so-great pictures.

Red-whiskered Bulbul

Extremely common in urban spaces, these raucous birds love fruits. I have found them gorging on ripe, splattered mangoes and papayas in the backyard every so often.

Red-whishkered Bulbul
Red-whishkered Bulbul
Red-whiskered Bulbul
Red-whiskered Bulbul

Peafowl

Peafowls are dime a dozen near my house in Kerala (Ottapalam, near Palghat) to the extent that they are considered pests by farmers. I am also assuming that the abundance of reptiles are sustaining them nice and well.

Peafowl
Peafowl

Sunbird

A visitor to my mango tree, Sunbirds are swift and agile making them difficult to photograph.

Sunbird
Sunbird

Brahminy Kite

Another commoner even in the urban landscape, these kites feed on reptiles. The overgrown plot next door houses a couple of their families and they seem to be proliferating.

Brahminy Kite
Brahminy Kite

Indian Grey Hornbill

There is a recent curious phenomenon of these guys being spotted everywhere  across India. These were spotted in Ottapalam, Kerala – the backyard of my house.

Indian Grey Hornbill
Indian Grey Hornbill
Indian Grey Hornbill
Indian Grey Hornbill

Oriental Magpie Robin

Another common species that are extremely jittery.

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Oriental Magpie Robin
Oriental Magpie Robin

Green Bee-eater

These are pretty and come right out of their hiding as soon as the rains stop to feast on the insects.

Green Bee-eater
Green Bee-eater
Green Bee-eater
Green Bee-eater

Black-hooded Oriole 

Another beautiful, yet noisy bird.

Black-hooded Oriole
Black-hooded Oriole

Asian Koel

Sometimes, this guy makes such a ruckus that it’s hard to get his ring out of my head long after he’s gone.

Asian Koel
Asian Koel

Rufous Treepie

This couple was spotted in my backyard in Kerala. They were making quite a racket that I decided to probe. I found out that their juvenile was just on the ground, probably practicing to fly. The parents were keeping a watch and would try to scare away cats and other predators when they passed along. As the day progressed, it became clear that their effort would become Herculean in protecting their baby.

I spotted a huge snake (rat snake, I presume) trying to find the baby for a meal. The parents, however, put up a brave fight chasing the snake for a long time with their catcalls. Did the snake succeed? I am not sure but I did not see the juvenile after that and the cackles of the adults subsided as well.

Rufous Treepie
Rufous Treepie
Rufous Treepie Juvenile
Rufous Treepie Juvenile
Rufous Treepie Couple
Rufous Treepie Couple

Like what you see? Or don’t? Why not let me know? Leave a comment.

 

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3 thoughts on “Birds of my backyard – Part I

  1. hey there! i’m loving your recent posts!
    I also blogged about wandering in the streets of Georgetown, Penang Island in Malaysia. Colonial Houses, Authentic Food, Street Arts and many more is what I have discovered!

    here’s what my recent post is all about…
    https://talkaboutbeauty.wordpress.com/2014/06/23/wandering-in-the-streets-of-georgetown/

    what do you think of old towns/ houses? have you been to a place like Georgtown before? what place is it?

    would be so nice to hear from you! 🙂

    cheers! xx

    deanna ( http://www.talkaboutbeauty.wordpress.com )

  2. Nice write up on the Birds in your back. A good beginning to bird watching is closest to home. Before long, you’ll recognize your feathered friends from their calls. Sad tale of the rufous tree pie. Most likely the snake got its meal. But that’s nature! Survival of the fittest.

    Looking forward to more of your stories.

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